mahna mahna .net

Like many personal blogs of its era, this blog is moribund, a casualty of what we might call "the Facebook effect." However, as of late 2015, two things are clear: (1) The Indie Web is a thing, and (2) the re-decentralization of the web is a thing. So who knows? 2016 2017 (!) could be the year this blog rises from its own ashes. Stay tuned!

Tuesday, 23 September 2003
We got rid of DDT, and we’ve banned PCBs, but the “better living through chemistry” folks have another acronym up their sleeve. And it’s everywhere.
When Oakland resident Katrina Friedman, 31, agreed to join the study, she assumed that her healthy diet, yoga and a clean job at Hot Studio, a small San Francisco design firm, was producing chemical-free milk for her baby daughter, Ruby.

But Friedman had PBDE levels in her milk at 79 parts per billion, higher than the number that triggered a ban of the flame retardants in Europe.

“I love my child more than anything. I want to protect her from broken glass, bullies at school and invisible poisons like this one. But I’m powerless. These chemicals aren’t banned in the United States, and we’re just continuing to add them in the environment,” Friedman said.
posted to /news at 10:23am :: 1 response



Can't Sit Still had this to say (09/24/2003 10:39:59):
this makes me wonder about the surge in cases of ADHD. is there something in our environment ("in the water") that is causing neural disorders in children? if so, how bad will it get? and the conspiracy theorist in me can't help but propose that the government and the pharmaceutical industries are in cahoots to make money off of disorderly children. hmph.

Your thoughts?

name:
url / email: (optional)
thoughts:
remember me next time
/blog (467)
/art (36)
/books (6)
/cinema (13)
/music (13)
/life (97)
/bayarea (25)
/misc (120)
/items (21)
/news (82)
/site (21)
/tech (42)
/wisdom (9)
Blosxom
Creative Commons
Atom
2010 (6)
2009 (10)
2008 (11)
2007 (30)
2006 (64)
2005 (58)
2004 (95)
2003 (193)
my Amazon wish list

© 2016 Matthew Newton, published under a Creative Commons License.